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UPCOMING MEETINGS the best way to get connected is to visit
  • Last Sunday's Message:
    December 09, 2018
    Advent Scripture:
    Psalms 130:1-8
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    Speaker: John Moon - Psalm 130 was uniquely used in the life of John Wesley. He was a pastor, a minister, who was yet unconverted! It is well known that he was struck forcibly by reading of the introduction to the book o...
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The Church Inside Out
Sun, Oct 28, 2018
Hits: 285
41 mins 48 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman -
Resolved Praise
Sun, Oct 21, 2018
Hits: 433
56 mins 12 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - The judgment that the Lord was going to bring upon Judah was somewhat surprising to Habakkuk because it was going to be meted out through the evil, idolatrous Babylonians (1:6). This unjust, brutal nation was going to judge God’s people. But how could this happen, and how long would God allow “the wicked to swallow up the man more righteous than he” (1:13)? That was Habakkuk’s concern. It’s not that he believed Judah was blameless, he just couldn’t understand how an even worse nation could be God’s tool of judgement, and then seemingly just go about their wickedness without divine intervention. What the prophet had to understand is that God’s unconventional means don’t compromise his goodness. Rather, God’s means should engender faith. In Habakkuk 2, God made it clear that he would judge the Babylonians and ultimately he would deliver his people. In other words, God was telling Habakkuk, “Don’t worry about the Babylonians. They will get their just deserves too. Just live by faith and trust my timing and plan.” The Babylonians were going to be a tool in God’s hand, but they would be judged for their sin and wickedness in the end. Through a series of “woe” statements, God indicated the basis for his future judgment of the Chaldeans. When it comes to God’s justice, his judgment is certain. So, if you are suffering you need to wait for God’s judgment (2:3), if you’re sinning, you need run from God’s judgment (2:2) by running with his warning to his Son who was judged for you. Either way, trust God because his work is sure.
The Church Inside Out
Sun, Oct 21, 2018
Hits: 299
26 mins 14 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman -
Resolved Praise
Sun, Oct 14, 2018
Hits: 497
51 mins 17 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - C.S. Lewis famously wrote, “God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: it is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.” In Habakkuk 1:5-11 God used his megaphone to talk to the prophet and his people. Great pain and suffering were going to come to Judah in the form of a Babylonian invasion. And through it God would rouse the deaf world. Now, Habakkuk couldn’t understand God’s timing or means, he couldn’t see God’s expansive work beyond his own people, but the prophet had to learn to accept God’s work and word. Habakkuk had to come to the realization that God could bring salvation even through judgment. So in our pain and suffering, may the Lord help us to trust his purpose and plan. May he open our eyes and dig out our ears so that we will stand in wonder and astonishment at his ways.
Resolved Praise
Sun, Oct 07, 2018
Hits: 557
45 mins 13 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - There are seasons and circumstances where our knowledge of God and our evaluation of life don’t correlate. Perhaps the wicked seem to be flourishing, or maybe the righteous are oppressed. Perhaps violence and wickedness abound and yet God seems distant and silent. Have you ever struggled with a disturbing situation and wondered about God’s timing or tolerance? Have you ever asked “how long” or “why” in the midst of difficulty? One thing a maturing Christian should understand is that God’s ways are not our ways, and thus we must always be humble in how we think about God’s work in our lives. Thinking we have God “figured out” can be a real barrier to walking humbly with him. The fact is, we have to learn to trust God in the dark (Isaiah 50:10) “Let him who walks in darkness and has no light trust in the name of the Lord and rely on his God.” As Habakkuk the prophet looks around at violence, contention, injustice and wickedness, it seems as though darkness is closing in and God is nowhere to be found. So will he trust God when he has no light? More importantly, will we? May the Lord anchor our faith in darkness when God’s timing and tolerance don’t seem to make sense.
The Church Inside Out
Sun, Oct 07, 2018
Hits: 355
33 mins 43 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman -
Standalone Messages
Sun, Sep 30, 2018
Hits: 394
35 mins 6 secs
Speaker: Josh MacAvoy - We have all heard it said, "familiarity breeds contempt." Our days are filled with tasks and habits so familiar, that we can almost perform them mindlessly. Of all the routines ion each week, our worship and response to God should never be take for granted or treated with contempt. This Sunday, we will look at Psalm 95, where God's people are exhorted to respond to God in anything but a routine fashion. Psalm 95 guides us along through exuberant praise, reverent contemplation, and a very timely warning regarding our response to God's word. In preparation, you can prayerfully consider Psalm 95 and Hebrews 3:7-4:13.
Open House
Sun, Sep 23, 2018
Hits: 492
40 mins 12 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - When you say that something matters, that it is important, then all of a sudden people have an expectation of what that should look like. If someone said lawn care was important, you would expect an immaculate green, golf course like front yard. If someone said fitness was important, you would expect particular eating and exercise habits. If someone claimed that organization was important to them, you would expect their desk to be neat and clean. So if someone says the church is important to them, what should that look like in the outworking of their life? My friends the church matters and that should show by how we live. May the Lord help us to value the importance of his church.
The Church Inside Out
Sun, Sep 23, 2018
Hits: 387
39 mins 12 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman -
Open House
Sun, Sep 16, 2018
Hits: 542
44 mins 41 secs
Speaker: Lukus Counterman - 1 Peter 5:5 says, y"God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble." In the account Naaman and Elisha in 2 Kings 5, we see this truth come to bear. Naaman, the pagan lager came to realize that he could not buy God's salvation, demand it by his own power, or merit it by reputation and achievements. Nothing he have (like gold and silver) and nothing he had done (like great military victories) could impress God or put him in his debt. God's salvation is offered by grace alone. His gift costs us nothing..except our pride. So, if we want God's healing, then we need humility. If we want God's salvation, then we must submit to his word. May the Lord help us to consider our need for God's grace today.